What Nannies and Au Pairs Need to Know in an Emergency

Have You Ever Had an Emergency with a Child in Your Care?

Could you recall vital information about your charge’s health in an emergency? Many doctors suggest that parents and caregivers keep a record of their kids’ important health facts handy. This can help a medical team make a better and more rapid diagnosis when time really counts.

Be sure the kids’ medical records have this information:

Allergies
This is especially crucial if a child is allergic to any medications — penicillin, for example — or other antibiotics. Food allergies can come into play, too, so make note of anything the child has had a reaction to. Kids who’ve previously been hospitalized may have developed latex allergies. This information can sometimes help emergency personnel find a cause for problems such as breathing difficulties and hives.

Medications
Your handy medical record should list any medications, including their dosages, that the kids currently take. Some medications react badly when taken together, so the paramedics and doctors need this information before they give a child anything. You’ll need to know when a child took the medication last and how much was taken.

Pre-Existing Illnesses
It is also extremely important for emergency personnel to be told of any health problems or illnesses the child has had. For example, does the child have diabetes, a bleeding disorder, or asthma? These pre-existing conditions can have a huge impact on which tests and treatments are administered in an emergency. Consider having any child who has one of these chronic health problems or a known allergy wear an identifying tag on a necklace or bracelet. This kind of rapid notification can help doctors who are providing emergency care, especially if your child suddenly becomes ill at childcare, school, or a friend’s house. Don’t forget to include the dates and types of operations a child has had — this can be important to the course of treatment in an emergency.

Immunizations
Keeping a clear and up-to-date record of the kids’ immunizations can help doctors do a better job of diagnosing a problem in an emergency. If the doctor suspects that a child has an infection, for example, it may save much time to know that the child has had a particular immunization. The staff at your doctor’s office can help you compile information on your kids’ immunization status.

Weight
There may not be time to weigh a child in an emergency. Having a recent weight handy can help doctors calculate dosages of any medication that may be needed.

Reference: Click here for KidsHealth Article

Have You Ever Had an Emergency with a Child in Your Care?

Comments

  1. The key as a caregiver is to stay calm. I fed my 13 month charge his first peanut better sandwhich and within minutes his face and neck swelled and he had hives on his wrists and face. I took him to the emergency room right away. They gave him some kind of oral steroid and benedryl. The doctor didnt seem to be too concerned just sent us on our way after observing him for about an hour an half. He gave me a prescription for prednisone to take for the next two days. We made an appointment with an allergist.

  2. One time a boy I watched said his tummy hurt. He went to school. Next day it hurt so bad he cried. Since his dr is off on Wednesdays I called the mom and asked her to meet us ER, he had fever and right side hurt. They put his IV in, drew blood, took a urine sample, gave him some pain medication and had him drink some stuff to aid them in the scan they ran on him. The test came back pretty fast that it was his appendix.His mom arrived while he was in pre-op. They weren't going to take him into surgery without her there. She appreciated my calmness in the crisis but she doesn't know I cried on my way home.

  3. I cared for a girl with asthma. Many days in hospital. Terrible parents NEVER EVER joined us in hospital with nebulizers remembering prescriptions. Was a nightmare.

  4. The key as a caregiver is to stay calm. I fed my 13 month charge his first peanut better sandwhich and within minutes his face and neck swelled and he had hives on his wrists and face. I took him to the emergency room right away. They gave him some kind of oral steroid and benedryl. The doctor didnt seem to be too concerned just sent us on our way after observing him for about an hour an half. He gave me a prescription for prednisone to take for the next two days. We made an appointment with an allergist.

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