Do You Let Children Under 2 Watch TV?

More Guidelines that Screen Time is Not Educational for Babies

As we recently mentioned once again, it is recommended that children under two-years old limit their time spent in front of televisions, computers, self-described educational games, and even grown-up shows playing in the background.

In fact, in 2009 Baby Einstein products were required to give parents a full refund on the purchase price on their misleading “educational” DVDs and currently Your Baby Can Read products have a complaint filed against them that their infant-reading program’s claims are false and misleading.

The American Academy of Pediatrics warns that video screen time provides no educational benefits for children under age two and leaves less room for activities that do, like interacting with other people and playing, the group said.

In an article in the New York Times it makes clear that there is no such thing as an educational program for such young children, and that leaving the TV on as background noise, as many households do, distracts both children and adults.

The article says, “The new report strongly warns parents against putting a TV in a very young child’s room and advises them to be mindful of how much their own use of media is distracting from playtime. In some surveys between 40 and 60 percent of households report having a TV on for much of the day — which distracts both children and adults, research suggests.”

The new report from the pediatrics association estimates that for every hour a child under two spends in front of a screen, he or she spends about 50 minutes less interacting with a parent, and about 10 percent less time in creative play.”

Click here to read entire article.

Comments

  1. I thought of this debate about baby reading programs last night when I was on zerotothree.org. On there it states, Formal classes and other activities that push babies and toddlers to learn concepts before they are ready do not help their development or make them do better in school. In fact, they can even make children feel like failures when they are pushed to do something they can’t succeed at or don’t enjoy. So treasure these early days of playing and cuddling with your little one—it is exactly what she needs to grow and learn.If any wants to read sensible suggested guidelines on how to develop language and literacy in the infant and toddler stages, please see this section of their website. http://main.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=ter_par_012_index

  2. Letting little kids watch tv is a total cop out. You shouldn't even call yourself a nanny if you have the tv on for the kids during the day.

  3. The kids hav tvs in their bedrooms, computers in their bedrooms, i-phone, i-pad. Their emails and texts aren't monitored. Its a shame but the parents are busy at work and not reading the articles or seeing the programs we see and are naïve. They are tired on the weekends and use the tv as a babysitter. If there is a tv in the playroom you know the kids are being neglected!

  4. I don't feel it's realistic for parents (or others) to expect kids not to watch any tv. They say under 2 can't learn but better to have them watch show about ABCs then soap operals or the news. Most nannies I know have the tv on all day. I only have it on when the kids are napping. I don't think parents should be hypocrits and let the kids watch tv on their time but not allow them to on my time.

  5. So ridiculous to think a child under 2could understand and tv show. Thankful that nannies I know are smart enough not to plop infants or toddlers in front of tv.

  6. Why is this an all or nothing proposition? Just because a young child is exposed to television doesn't mean that the child isn't also attended to and interacted with by engaged parents or caregivers. It would seem that protecting a child from media (where does it end?), removing tv's from the house, etc. are drastic measures and do more to harm, than to help. Things aren't so black and white! Let's be practical.

  7. Why is this an all or nothing proposition? Just because a young child is exposed to television doesn't mean that the child isn't also attended to and interacted with by engaged parents or caregivers. It would seem that protecting a child from media (where does it end?), removing tv's from the house, etc. are drastic measures and do more to harm, than to help. Things aren't so black and white! Let's be practical.

  8. When the tv is on the toddler doesn't watch for very long. It's very obvious she hasn't a clue what it going on.

  9. I mentioned this to my nanny friends at playground today and they ALL said, "Nooo!" They listed DVDs they swear have taught kids the alphabet and colors and numbers. I think I agree with the article.

  10. Call me a bad nanny- but I have let charges less than 2 years old watch some TV. Some days- when you've done it all- many times- you just need a little down time- especially when the child or you are not feeling well- or you can't get outside due to the weather.I think everything in balance and I don't think a little TV here and there is going to do much harm if you keep everything in balance and don't make TV the first and only choice. Of course once they get a taste for TV- they want more and more. So with my charges I let them pick a show in the a.m. and then the p.m.- and they know how much they are going to get- and that helps me to get things done in the a.m. and p.m.

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