Nanny Confessions: Being a Live-In Nanny

The Benefits and Difficulties of Being a Live-In

Donna Moore is an 18-year-old high school graduate originally from Birmingham, Alabama that moved to Fairfield, Connecticut for a year to work as a live-in nanny. She has found that working for a family with three children has been a great opportunity. The live-in nanny explains, “The family welcomed me with open arms and have been very generous providing me with a beautiful apartment above their garage, a car to drive on my free time, all my meals, and travel expenses.”

But Moore says that it wasn’t easy adjusting to the new home and job. She explains, “The hardest part of becoming a nanny was that I became very homesick. During the long hours without the parents in the house I felt lonely only caring for children.”

The job was not as easy as she had expected either. She says, “The job is not glamorous. I did not realize what a physically exhausting job caring for kids in a huge home would be.”

But, the family included her in all weekend outings and socializing opportunities and encouraged her to invite other nannies over for sleep-overs which eventually helped her from feeling homesick. Now, she loves the job. Moore says, “My favorite part of being a nanny has been being able to travel to New York City on my time-off. I would not have been able to afford to travel to New York City had I not worked and lived close by to Manhattan this year.”

She says to those considering becoming a live-in nanny, “The best advice for nanny candidates about to move across the country to become a live-in nanny for the first time is to remember that first and foremost you are moving for a job.”

But, Moore explains, “If you don’t mind working hard, long hours then the benefits of moving across country for a year can be a great learning experience.”

Mariana Gonzales is a 19-year-old live-in nanny that moved from Los Alamos, New Mexico to Bethesda, Maryland who has loved becoming a working member of a family. Gonzales boasts about her favorite part of being a nanny is, “I personally love traveling and have been paid to accompany the family on trips.”

Gonzales continues, “Not only have I traveled all over the east coast including Disney in Florida but I even got to see London and Paris which I never could have afforded myself.”

Gonzales does warn, “Some nannies feel overworked and overwhelmed when traveling with the family. I happen to be lucky to work for very fair parents who compensate me generously with both money and time-off.”
“I am allowed to take the children to any tourist attractions. museums, anywhere we want to go and they pay for everything,” says Gonzales.

Patricia King is a 23-year-old nanny with a degree in early childhood education. After finding it hard to land a permanent teaching job she decided to move from Sherwood, Oregon to Basking Ridge, New Jersey to work as a live-in nanny. She has found the nanny job to be a great learning experience.

King explains, “While earning my degree I learned about being a teacher and how to work with parents from within the classroom. Now I get to learn about the children and parents from another perspective — inside their home.”

She continues, “I have been taught how to assign homework. But now I see how difficult it can become managing a lot of homework with extracurricular activities and busy lives. What an eye-opener for me.”

“Caring for the children and communicating effectively with the parents and children as a nanny only adds precious skills to my resume,”says King.

She admits that the most difficult part of being a live-in nanny has been privacy. “When I first moved to New Jersey the family had never hired a live-in nanny before,” says King. “At first the children did not know they couldn’t go in my room any time they pleased,” says King.
She continues, “Although I felt we lacked some personal boundaries in the beginning it seems trivial now. The members of the family changed immediately and give me plenty of privacy now,” says King.
The live-in nanny recommends, “The most important thing for nannies to remember is to maintain some professional objectiveness with the job. Remember, this is a job, not your own family,” says King.

Nancy Lacey is a nanny originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma has been working as a live-in childcare provider in Beverly Hills, California for the same family for six-years. Lacey says some of the perks of her job have been, “Meeting other nannies. Some even work for celebrities.”

But, she admits it was not an easy adjustment at first. “I was very homesick for the first few months and used to call my parents crying all the time,” says Lacey.

She continues, “The hardest part of being a nanny is the schedule. The parents were so spontaneous changing my schedule all the time.” Lacey explains, “I had to sit down with the parents and explain I was exhausted and that I needed to develop a set schedule so I could plan my time-off as well.” “Since that talk things have improved and I truly love my job,” she says.

“Working so closely with the children is so rewarding. I can see my personal influence in their development and feel so fortunate to have had this working experience,” says Lacey.

Lacey’s advice to others considering moving to become live-in nannies, “The homesickness bug eventually bites. But be patient. You will get over being homesick.” She recommends, “Allow the family to help you get over the hump so you can enjoy the experience.”

“Just a few of the aspects of the job I will treasure most is forming a close relationship with the children, being trusted by the parents allowed the responsibility for every aspect of their well being, creating a happy and inspirational environment for the children, and I have loved watching them grow and develop,” says Lacey.

“I know I sound like a brochure but being a nanny is one of the most rewarding and worthwhile jobs you can have. If you love being with children, are dedicated to keeping them safe and happy, and are interested in educating and stimulating them to prepare for later life then becoming a nanny is ideal career for you,” explains Lacey.

“I love the family very much now and no matter where I move, they will be my friends for life,” says Lacey.

Comments

  1. Really nice blog, especially the last paragraph 🙂 it’s so true! We have some fantastic Nanny jobs available to, live in and out – you can see them at http://www.greatbritishnannies.com

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