Sometimes You Have to Bite Your Tongue

Nanny Confessions: Parents Should Think Before They Speak
By Stephanie Felzenberg, Nanny and Editor How to Be the Best Nanny Blog

In the perfect nanny and employer relationship neither party complains or gossips about the other to others. Unfortunately, more often than not, parents and nannies do gossip to friends and family about one another. It’s immature and unprofessional for sure, but it is human nature to complain to others when we feel unappreciated.

Of course some constructive criticism (or educational criticism) is necessary at any job. Bosses have to explain to their employees how to properly perform their jobs. In a perfect world, when parents complain about something, nannies calmly ask their employers to show them how they would like them to perform their job and make an effort to make those changes. But, more often than not, nannies feel they are being negatively criticized, resent the comments, and turn around and complain about their employers to friends and family.

To reduce negative feelings, parents simply should think before they speak. It is helpful if parents remember that most nannies have good intentions and are doing the best job they can. Meanwhile, nannies must realize that parents aren’t necessarily criticizing them when they are simply giving them instructions. Nannies can be sensitive, so parents should consider the big picture¸ learn to pick their battles, and think before they criticize their domestic employees.

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